On Writing Dialogue via Omnivoracious

Tom at Omnivoracious titles his post, “Write Dialogue Like You’re Fighting a Marlin.”

Tom at Omnivoracious titles his post, “Write Dialogue Like You’re Fighting a Marlin.” (A great headline that grabs your interest.) Tom points his readers to advice given by Matthew Simmons on constructing compelling dialogue.

Start with Tom’s post and follow his links to the related sites. Really great insight to be found there.

How are you at writing dialogue? What is your style ?

Sailing On

As I mentioned earlier, my novel revisions felt solid for the first time.

As I mentioned earlier, my novel revisions felt solid for the first time. My writing group this past Monday buoyed me, confirming my belief. The members’ enthusiasm was heartening. Their criticism, more importantly, were ever insightful. All but one character was vivid and relatable. Even the one I had the most difficulty portraying, the rake Michael, was clear.

Malcolm, on the other hand, was too distant, too much of a cold fish. He is a cerebral guy. I will need to warm him up on another pass.

But I forge ahead. In fact, I am ahead. I have new chapters ready for them and a few more for the meeting after that. Hopefully I can keep this up and have a complete manuscript in a few months.

How’s your writing going?

Wind at My Back

The past two weeks have been really productive for me writing-wise.

The past two weeks have been really productive for me writing-wise. I’ve revised a number of chapters previously submitted to my writing group and sent them off for the next meeting. For the first time I feel on solid ground with those chapters. Hopefully the group will agree.

Also, I think I found the question for this novel: What do you do with immortality?

What would you do?

Ira Glass on Storytelling

Continuing a subject from the previous post, I came across a series of videos by National Public Radio host of All Things Considered Ira Glass.

Continuing a subject from the previous post, namely storytelling, I came across a series of videos by National Public Radio host of This American Life Ira Glass. I think he offers valuable advice that you can apply to your own writing. I’m linking to the website of Lokesh Dhakar since that’s where I discovered it.

And thank you to Dhakar for posting it.

Re-writing New Paths

For the past few evenings, just before bed, I’ve been easily filling handwritten pages of my novel in my spiral notebook.

For the past few evenings, just before bed, I’ve been easily filling handwritten pages of my novel in my spiral notebook. I’m finding that when I come to a point where a scene or a chapter isn’t quite to my liking, rather than tweak it here or there, I start from scratch. So I’ve been doing lately and discovering there is more momentum and focus than prior drafts. I am making a point not refer to what I’ve written already. 

I write as if for the first time. This frees me to go down different paths and find better phrasing or dialogue.

In this recent case, I begin the rewritten chapter from a different point in time. I’m writing a few minutes earlier, still beginning with action, but with more details that will pay off later. The perspective remains the same, but it’s close-up now, perhaps claustrophobic for a time. I think it’s working well so far.

What are some techniques you use to overcome re-write fatigue?