Vigil Comic Books

Over the weekend I had the opportunity to reread the multi-mini-series comic book, Vigil.

First issue of Vigil comic book mini series by Loudermilk and Ivereson.
First issue of Vigil comic book mini series by Loudermilk and Ivereson.

Over the weekend I had the opportunity to reread the multi-mini-series comic book, Vigil. Written by Arvin Loudermilk and illustrated by Mike Iverson, the vampire comic first appeared for two issues in 1992 under the imprint Innovation. Over the years it changed from Innovation to Millenium to Duality Press (the creators’ own imprint).

The series has held up since I had first read the title — wow! 17 years ago. (I feel old now.)

The story centers on a vampire named Grace Kimble who is one tough blonde with a serious crush on big guns. (Think Sarah Connor of T2.) In the first story, she aims to take down a late-night talk show host who is a vampire pretending to be a human pretending to be a vampire. With his fame and wealth he gets many unsuspecting women in bed and thereby their blood. In Grace’s efforts to stop him, she inadvertently involves the clueless movie star, Greg Tonell. Nonetheless, Grace ends the talk show host’s life. Unfortunately, Tonell  is wrongfully implicated in  the murder and the two have to escape to Mexico.

The subsequent one-shots and mini-series follow them searching for a cure for Grace’s “affliction,” falling in love with each other and eluding myriad enemies who want Kimble, Tonell or both captured/killed.

The art is black-and-white and realistically drawn. The style works with the writing, very cinematic. Like an action film there are lots of panels and pages with hand-to-hand fighting, gunfire and narrow escapes. Written for mature readers.

I like that it’s a simple, well-told story.

A vampire mythology isn’t touched on in the series. Grace considers herself infected with a virus, though she refers to herself as a vampire. She’s hard to put down, heals quickly and is quite cold. She struggles to be  human and relies on Tonell for the right push. Tonell goes through a nice arc through the series.

Have you read this?

Being Human Eps. 3

Last night I remembered to watch another episode of the BBC America series, Being Human.

Last night I remembered to watch another episode of the BBC America series, Being Human. I did enjoy watching it and the werewolf is the most interesting one to me so far. A very nervous, unsure man trying to do the best for everyone else at the cost of his own happiness.

From what I can tell, the vampire can go out in the sunlight and the ghost for some reason can lift objects as any person could but when she touches someone, they don’t feel it.

Anyone watch this show? Share your comments here.

Being Human

Flipping channels last night I had come across bits of a new show called Being Human on BBC America.

Flipping channels last night I had come across bits of a new show called Being Human on BBC America. The premise may seem like the set up of a joke: A vampire, a werewolf and a ghost share a flat … But actually I found it to be a charming story. Three damned individuals trying to hold onto their humanity. I think this was the second episode and I will try to catch the pilot and the third episode this week.

Anyone else watch this show?

Thank you Steve of Fountain Books

Easily the best vampire and horror novel I can recall reading.

I recently finished Let the Right One In, by John Lindqvist, recommended by Steve of Fountain Books. Easily the best vampire and horror novel I can recall reading. The story gripped me up to the final pages. Though it’s been adapted for the screen by the author, I do not wish to see the movie version. The gruesome scenes were vivid enough on the page.

Have you read it? What are your thoughts?

Writing Show: From Page to Stage and Screen

Since I had missed the last Writing Show, I made sure to come to this one, especially since it will be on hiatus next month, returning in August.

Before I get to the main event, I’ll mention that I renewed my membership with James River Writers , and was rewarded with a mug (pictured below). Also, during intermission I spoke with Steve from Fountain Books who manned the bookstand at the back of the auditorium. He sold me on purchasing the novel Let the Right One In, written by John Lindqvist (now a motion picture written by John Lindqvist). Though very dark and disturbing, Steve enjoyed it thoroughly. What interested me was that it involves a vampire and I’m ever on the lookout for quality vampire novels since I’m writing my own. Among the scores I’ve read over the years, only a few have been enjoyable for me. The last two I’ve read were The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova and Fledgling by Octavia Butler. They were excellent and hopefully Let the Right One In will make a positive trend. I’ve put it at the top of my reading list.

James River Writers mug.
James River Writers mug.

Since I had missed the last Writing Show, I made sure to come to this one, especially since it will be on hiatus next month, returning in August. Given the topic — stage and screen writing — I didn’t expect to be as interested as I was. Typical of these monthly events, the speakers were first rate. The panelists included the bearded storyteller Clay Chapman, writer/director Bryan Doerris and screenwriter Megan Holley (Sunshine Cleaning), with Michael Cordell moderating (his debut in this capacity, I think).

More so than previous Shows, the panelists really engaged each other in conversation, countering, underscoring or querying what another panelist just said. At one point, Mr. Doerris lamented America’s waning love of theater. He cited that less than nine percent of Americans attended a play last year, though they have a hearty appetite for cinema.

At this point, it occurred to me perhaps a reason for why people prefer movies over plays. Movies are effortless. They explain it all to you. There isn’t much left to the imagination. In theater, all that’s needed are the actors and the audience (Mr. Chapman’s point). Stage performers engage the audience, thus each performance is unique. With little scenery and props, if any at all, the actors speak, gesture, direct their eyes, move about the stage in ways that can make the audience believe they’re in a pub or on the moon. Their minds fill in what’s unheard and unseen. Much like books.